Archives for March 2018

Cordylines Fill Fort Lauderdale Garden Center

Cordylines fill Fort Lauderdale garden center.

On a recent visit to Fort Lauderdale I could not resist a visit to a nursery called Living Color Garden Center.  I passed it regularly on the road to the hotel where I was staying.

The colorful plants behind the large fence that surrounded the property caught my eye.

The plant I noticed as I walked around inside had to be the tropical plant called cordyline.

Here is a short video compiled from photos I took during my visit.  You can see the cordyline varieties in both red and yellow.[below]

Here is a photo of cordyline terminalis, or Hawaiian Ti plant, with its yellow and green colors. [below]

This is a red cordyline called ‘Dr. Frank Brown’ from the same nursery. [below]

I also found another red called ‘Chilli Pepper’.

A showy cordyline offers a bit of a Victorian look to the garden in the summer.

Introduced into Europe in the early 1800s, the cordyline became important during the  Victorian period.

English garden writer David Stuart writes in his book The Garden Triumphant: The Victorian Legacy that during Victorian times the cordyline became the ‘dot’ plant which was surrounded by many other flowering plants, whether in a container or in a flower bed.

Today a gardener can choose from among several varieties of the cordyline for a bit of that Victorian look.

You can find the species cordyline fruticosa or Hawaian Ti at both box stores and some nurseries in a gallon and a half container. You may have to look in the indoor plant section of the store. This cordyline is much taller and wider than the popular cordyline australis  ‘Red Star.’ In the pot it stands almost two feet high and more than a foot wide. It can easily fill a large container by itself.

In warmer areas of the country like Florida cordyline grows outdoors all year. The plant originates in tropical Asia, Australia, and the Pacific Islands.

What is amazing about the cordyline is its long showy, stiff colorful foliage. It is the perfect plant choice to add that lush tropical color to any outdoor summer environment. Easy to care for, it is tolerant of both over and under watering.

Though the cordyline is a tropical plant, once popular in the Victorian garden, it certainly can still add both color and structure to the summer garden in areas with a warm summer.



Cottage Gardens Finally Recognized

Cottage gardens finally recognized.

Everybody loves the cottage garden. It holds a mystique of a garden, limited in space, but with plants galore, mostly flowers.

There were cottage gardens in England for centuries.  If you define the term as the garden of the worker, at the time of the monastery garden in the Middle Ages, for example, the townspeople who knew the monks probably received plants from them for their own gardens. That was a cottage garden.

During the time of the landscape revolution in eighteenth century England, it was only the garden of the aristocrat, or wealthy landowner, that was discussed in poetry, articles, and books.

The term ‘English garden’ meant at that time the landscape of the gentry.

It was not until the beginning of the nineteenth century that the cottage garden began to be seen as an essential form of garden.

Edward Hyams writes in his book English Cottage Gardens  that the two garden writers “John Claudius Loudon and his wife Jane can fairly be said to have created the nineteenth century suburban garden which, in the long run, influenced the shape and planting of the country cottage garden too.”

When the Loudons recognized in their writing the importance of gardens other than those owned by the wealthy, the cottage garden became an important topic in garden literature.

The Loudons opened the door to an appreciation for gardening by social classes other than the aristocracy.

Hyams says, “The Loudons, the horticultural press, and the horticultural societies brought the cottager gardener into the modern age of gardening.”

It was no surprise then that the magazine Cottage Garden began in 1848.

It was when the Loudons wrote for suburban gardeners and cottage gardeners that gardening changed forever.

Garden writers learned from all styles of gardening including the middle class and the worker.

They wrote for anybody who gardened.

Cottage gardens finally became an important topic.



Connecticut’s Flower Show Included Rose Tale

Connecticut’s Flower Show Included rose tale.

Nineteenth century Rochester, New York seed company owner James Vick included a letter from a customer in his Vick’s illustrated Monthly of 1878.  

The letter said, “A distinguished divine said that a Rose is the autograph of God. His signature, in the house or in the garden, is a benediction of sweetness and beauty.”

The Connecticut Flower and Garden Show, held a few days ago in Hartford, included a wonderful exhibit about the rose.

The Connecticut Rose Society created a setting for the mythical Bavarian town called Rosenburg.

The details in the exhibit, including its colorful backdrop, caught my eye. I couldn’t resist checking it out. [below]

The Connecticut Rose Society’s exhibit at the Connecticut Flower and Garden Show

In the town of Rosenburg roses flourish in the best of conditions.

Baron von Herz who lives in the tall castle on the mountain grows roses for his wife.

The people in the town also cultivate many rose gardens that include climbing roses as well.

Unfortunately the Baron becomes ill and dies.

His widow, distraught over her husband’s death, turns against the town people who treasure their roses.

She sends diseases like black fungus spores and destructive insects to their roses. She holds these pests in her beatiful embroidered bag meant to deceive onlookers.

The villagers call her Baroness Dunkelherz (Baroness Darkheart).

The only recourse the townspeople have is to watch for her visit.

Thus the roses continue to bloom only with vigilance at all times.

Doesn’t that seem to be the story in cultivating any rose?

The Connecticut Rose Society told the story well.